Carnism in the animal protection field

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DaedalusZA
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Carnism in the animal protection field

Post by DaedalusZA » Thu Oct 10, 2019 5:42 pm

I wrote a piece two months back and the only backlash has come from my vegan colleagues in the field. I have enough pennies for everyone's thoughts :)

"People who live in greenhouses shouldn't throw bones"

Recently, I was privy to a social media post that celebrated the raising of funds for the care of needy cats and dogs. The largest contributor to the funds was the selling of *boerewors rolls and *chicken samosas. While selling farm animal products to fund the protection of domestic animals is by no means an uncommon practice, but I was dumbfounded by the praises from those involved of how delicious the samosas were. Although I bit my tongue as not to derail the “success” of the fundraiser as well as to avoid evoking the ire of Facebook keyboard warriors, I felt the deep need to highlight the moral inconsistency.
.....

Full version with 13 para: https://bit.ly/3256P8n
Short version with 3 para: https://bit.ly/3219RKK

*Boerewors is a type of sausage, usually made from beef.
*Samosa is a triangular savoury pastry.

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brimstoneSalad
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Post by brimstoneSalad » Sun Oct 13, 2019 12:00 am

I agree that such campaigns are troubling, I think it just adds to it that these are almost the opposite of effective altruism. Lives saves per dollar in these cases (where here it's in the negative) are usually at least very small. And more speculatively, they may serve as pseudosatisfiers for the urge to do good, offering people the sense of having done something good and *possibly* serving in place of something else, or justifying to them some harm too ("I did this good thing so it's OK if I do some bad things too").

Better to spend money preventing an unwanted pet population than trying to remedy it. Of course, that hardly tugs heart-strings. People want to see their impacts in a tangible sense.

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