How do I become vegan? [Guide]

Vegan message board for support on vegan related issues and questions.
Topics include philosophy, activism, effective altruism, plant-based nutrition, and diet advice/discussion whether high carb, low carb (eco atkins/vegan keto) or anything in between.
Meat eater vs. Vegan debate welcome, but please keep it within debate topics.
User avatar
vegan81vzla
Full Member
Posts: 137
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2015 11:30 pm
Religion: Christian
Diet: Vegan

Re: How do I become vegan? [Guide]

Post by vegan81vzla » Sun Jun 26, 2016 5:47 pm

First, stablish a time lapse that it is convenient but not too long that it takes forever (I.e. one month or two months)

After that, the first thing you want to do is empty your fridge or kitchen counters or any other place you usually store food in your house from any animal products. Once this is done your first cycle begins. You are not allowed to fill them up again with any animal product. You are allowed though, to take small fractions and cook them at home, but not store them in any way, shape or form. In this time period, you should learn to make tubers and roots part of your staple foods. You have to inform yourself about prices of produce and how to buy cheaper plant based food.

At the end of the first cycle, a new time period begins. Now, not only you're not allowed to store, but also not allowed to cook animal products at home. You might take animal products already cooked and eat them at the dinning area, but not inside the kitchen. Evidently, you are not allowed to store them either. In this period, you have to learn to include cereals and grains to your staple foods. You have to inform yourself about the dietary benefits for your own body and how to handle the many problems you might experience from refraining yourself from a carnist diet. Learning about addictions is good, as some symptoms might be similar to those trying to quit alcohol consumption, smoking or other drugs.

On the third cycle, it becomes harder. Now you are ready to not allow yourself to take animal products inside your house. At this level you'll understand how expensive can it be to eat out all the time vs eating vegan at home. You'll start to progressively eat less animal products. At this stage you should learn to add vegetables, leafy greens and others like flowers and al into your diet. You have to learn about social problems that arise from depending on animals for our food. This might be more difficult as consuming animals is socially accepted and it social implications have not been widely researched nor documented.

After this, the fourth period of time has to be dedicated to learn to avoid purchasing any animal products. The only reason you should eat animal products is if offered or invited (Buddhists level) this of course won't happen very often, as people usually don't offer their food to others. at this stage you can add fruits and nuts to your diet. You can also learn about why is it bad for animals, but not only those involved in the exploitation, but the whole animal kingdom.

The fifth phase, and if all the research has been done correctly, is for you to started rejecting any animal product altogether. You are ready to give wise and documented answers on why you don't eat any animal products. You might want to learn how to spice your food properly, and the use of sugars too, and cooking without oils. Your last phase of research is on he damages to the environment that come from depending on animals for our food.

There is a sixth phase which is harder, but only reserved for those who have any kind of food related enterprise. Now you can start veganising your business and with it, others around you.

After this, you can start learning the benefits of fasting to further tune up your body with nature. This seventh phase, if done properly will help you clean up completely your body from other issues you might still have from all the animal products you had consumed throughout your live until those six months before.

Indigo
Newbie
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Aug 19, 2016 5:20 am
Religion: None (Atheist)
Diet: Meat-Eater

Post by Indigo » Sat Aug 20, 2016 1:41 am

As someone planning to go on a vegan diet in the near future, I have one thing I disagree with in this post. It is not a huge point, but rather a really small thing.

"Vegan is not a diet it is a lifestyle."

I wholeheartedly disagree with this, but have a caveat to that. Vegan can be a lifestyle if you choose to live it. I'm choosing vegan diets not for protecting animals, not to disavow myself from animal use, and not because of any other ethical reason. I'm constantly seeing how vegan foods can be healthier and even cheaper than non-vegan foods. So I am choosing this dietary decision for my health and well being, not the health or well-being of animals. If it helps animals as a consequence of my decision, then that's an unintended by happily accepted benefit, though definitely not the reason. I don't accept that idea that one should feel the need to protect animals to want to adopt this dietary choice. I for one don't feel that way at all. I have no qualm with the idea of animals being used for food, especially in places where crops don't grow well. People in parts Alaska often eat whale fat, not because they can't afford land to grow plants, but because growing is harder, and it's more efficient to eat meat. For others who eat meat because they enjoy it, life is one time, you should enjoy the one life you have, not take away the things you enjoy that don't harm other humans.

However, the decision to eat meat does logistically seem like a poor health choice, so for that reason, I am making the conscious effort to improve my health, and my happiness, by making a stand toward eating healthier. Some people maintain an omnivorous diet while trying to eat healthy, but that gives me no interest. If I'm going to eat meat I'm going to enjoy it, but I'm not so tethered to animal products that I feel a need to eat them. My hardest stance won't be will power, but education, knowing what is available. That is why I came to this forum. While I'm not the majority by any stretch, making the blanket statement that veganism isn't just a diet is not a universal statement, it for one doesn't apply to me. I respect your view of it as a lifestyle though, it's wholly a good way to view the world. Wanting to protect is a good quality for humans, but understand I do not see myself as 'out to protect animals', even if I am eating at the same dinner table as someone who is.

veganbirthchild
Newbie
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 2:49 pm
Religion: Hindu
Diet: Vegetarian

Post by veganbirthchild » Mon Aug 29, 2016 2:58 pm

Hello guys,
I am from India and a vegetarian. I was a vegetarian by birth. My parents never ate meat and neither did I. Although, many of my friends are non-vegetarians and eat all kinds of meat (except for beef which is banned in majority of Indian states), I never had the urge to eat meat. My objective of joining this forum is becoming a vegan which is almost impossible to become in India if you belong to the lower middle class families (as I do). This may surprise you as 69% of India is vegetarian. But we rely on dairy products.
This article might show you what I am talking about. (http://forbesindia.com/article/recliner/being-vegan-in-india/4482/1?id=4482&pg=1)
I want people here to help me find cheaper alternatives to dairy products as India heavily depends on them for survival. My family has 1.5 litres of milk each day. We are 3 people.
Thank You. :)

User avatar
Sapphire Lightning
Junior Member
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri May 13, 2016 10:06 am
Religion: None (Atheist)
Diet: Vegan

Post by Sapphire Lightning » Thu Oct 06, 2016 4:54 pm

Indigo wrote: "Vegan is not a diet it is a lifestyle."

I wholeheartedly disagree with this, but have a caveat to that. Vegan can be a lifestyle if you choose to live it. I'm choosing vegan diets not for protecting animals, not to disavow myself from animal use, and not because of any other ethical reason. I'm constantly seeing how vegan foods can be healthier and even cheaper than non-vegan foods.

You are describing a plant-based diet. Veganism is not a diet, it is a lifestyle BY DEFINITION.

According to the vegan society (the people who coined the term "Vegan") veganism is:
"A philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude—as far as is possible and practicable—all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of humans, animals and the environment. In dietary terms it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals."
Carnist: Kills animals and then takes from their bodies
Vegetarian: Takes from animals' bodies, and then kills them when they are no longer profitable
Vegan: Avoids unnecessary harm to animals as much as is possible and practicable

maledicenttails
Newbie
Posts: 12
Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2017 6:00 pm
Religion: Other
Diet: Vegan

Post by maledicenttails » Sun Mar 05, 2017 9:10 pm

Hello there!

I am a vegan from New Zealand currently living in Japan. I thought I'd leave a few tips that I've picked up since living here for the past 4 months.

- Tofu is one of the cheapest protein sources here, selling for around .50 USD per 300g block. Firm tofu is called momen (もめん) and silken tofu is called kinu (きぬ). The cheapest protein source that I have found is okara (おから). Okara is soybean pulp leftover from straining soybeans into soymilk. It is considered a waste product in Japan (like vegetable peels), so is often sold in large quantities for a cheap price, or simply given away. Beans and vital wheat gluten, not so cheap.

- If calcium fortified anything exists here, I've seen very little of it. Plant milks are often unfortified, and the plant milks that are are super expensive for little payoff (110mg per cup - I can't remember if this is an adequate amount or not, but my gut tells me not really). The only thing that I have found that is decent is a 200ml carton of drinkable yoghurt from kikkomans that is fortified with 350mg of calcium per serve.

-Produce here is expensive in general. I never thought I'd live to see a day where an apple costs more than an avocado. It's possible to consume greens, but don't be surprised if you find yourself gravitating towards frozen vegetables. As a New Zealander where fresh produce is typically cheap and plentiful, this was the big shock for me.

- Nutritional yeast doesn't exist here. Or many other things vegan for that matter. Probably in Tokyo. Or ordering online (which is a pain in itself if you're ordering from a Japanese website). For any vegan related stuff that you desperately need, go to iHerb.com.

- MSG is delicious and decently priced. Go get some MSG - it's made by a company named Ajinomoto.

- You are going to find dairy in EVERYTHING here. The Japanese tend to follow french style cooking. So lots of dairy, and lots of pork fat.

-The Japanese government is serious about allergen information. They have a list of 7 ingredients that must be declared upfront on products by law, and a list of 20 different ingredients that they recommend be declared if it is incorporated in the product. I can't count how many times I've seen Apples indicated as an allergen on products. This website page is pretty good for identifying stuff http://expatsguide.jp/features/everyday-life/food-allergy-labeling/.

- Most of the vegan food you're going to find here is often traditional (like mochi) and reasonably priced.

That's all that I can think of for now; if I can remember anything else, I'll update.

jessdanir
Newbie
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 2:25 am
Religion: None (Atheist)
Diet: Meat-Eater

Post by jessdanir » Tue Jun 06, 2017 4:22 am

Indigo wrote:
Sat Aug 20, 2016 1:41 am
As someone planning to go on a vegan diet in the near future, I have one thing I disagree with in this post. It is not a huge point, but rather a really small thing.

"Vegan is not a diet it is a lifestyle."

I wholeheartedly disagree with this, but have a caveat to that. Vegan can be a lifestyle if you choose to live it. I'm choosing vegan diets not for protecting animals, not to disavow myself from animal use, and not because of any other ethical reason. I'm constantly seeing how vegan foods can be healthier and even cheaper than non-vegan foods. So I am choosing this dietary decision for my health and well being, not the health or well-being of animals. If it helps animals as a consequence of my decision, then that's an unintended by happily accepted benefit, though definitely not the reason. I don't accept that idea that one should feel the need to protect animals to want to adopt this dietary choice. I for one don't feel that way at all. I have no qualm with the idea of animals being used for food, especially in places where crops don't grow well. People in parts Alaska often eat whale fat, not because they can't afford land to grow plants, but because growing is harder, and it's more efficient to eat meat. For others who eat meat because they enjoy it, life is one time, you should enjoy the one life you have, not take away the things you enjoy that don't harm other humans.

However, the decision to eat meat does logistically seem like a poor health choice, so for that reason, I am making the conscious effort to improve my health, and my happiness, by making a stand toward eating healthier. Some people maintain an omnivorous diet while trying to eat healthy, but that gives me no interest. If I'm going to eat meat I'm going to enjoy it, but I'm not so tethered to animal products that I feel a need to eat them. My hardest stance won't be will power, but education, knowing what is available. That is why I came to this forum. While I'm not the majority by any stretch, making the blanket statement that veganism isn't just a diet is not a universal statement, it for one doesn't apply to me. I respect your view of it as a lifestyle though, it's wholly a good way to view the world. Wanting to protect is a good quality for humans, but understand I do not see myself as 'out to protect animals', even if I am eating at the same dinner table as someone who is.
I just have to say it is really lovely to see these types of posts here. As much as I want to adopt a vegan diet and join these types of vegan forums, I personally have no ethical reasoning for wanting such a diet. I would try to eat vegetarian, but most dairy makes me feel physically sick. I do not see eating a vegan diet as a lifestyle, but potentially a way to further improve my health. I have strayed away and leave most forums when I encounter the "holier than thou" approach many vocal vegans take. For me, it is a diet as much as me not eating processed meats and pre-made meals is; some can choose to make it a lifestyle, but I think for many that is out of the question.

User avatar
NonZeroSum
Master in Training
Posts: 945
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2017 6:30 am
Religion: None (Atheist)
Diet: Vegan
Location: North Wales, UK

Post by NonZeroSum » Tue Jun 06, 2017 4:57 am

jessdanir wrote:
Tue Jun 06, 2017 4:22 am
Indigo wrote:
Sat Aug 20, 2016 1:41 am
Vegan is not a diet it is a lifestyle.
I wholeheartedly disagree with this . . . I'm constantly seeing how vegan foods can be healthier and even cheaper than non-vegan foods. So I am choosing this dietary decision for my health and well being, not the health or well-being of animals. If it helps animals as a consequence of my decision, then that's an unintended by happily accepted benefit, though definitely not the reason. I don't accept that idea that one should feel the need to protect animals to want to adopt this dietary choice. I for one don't feel that way at all. I have no qualm with the idea of animals being used for food, especially in places where crops don't grow well.
I just have to say it is really lovely to see these types of posts here.
That's really cool, we should have more vegans primarily for their health that we can point too so people can relate, I know VeganGains talks a lot about nutrition and some body building, but they also wax lyrical about the torture of animals and include its footage, of which the latter is really off-putting to me, like I went vegan to avoid feeling complicit in that, I don't relish seeing it as some mastebatery in-group ceremony we have to keep re-living.
jessdanir wrote:
Tue Jun 06, 2017 4:22 am
As much as I want to adopt a vegan diet and join these types of vegan forums, I personally have no ethical reasoning for wanting such a diet. I would try to eat vegetarian, but most dairy makes me feel physically sick. I do not see eating a vegan diet as a lifestyle, but potentially a way to further improve my health. I have strayed away and leave most forums when I encounter the "holier than thou" approach many vocal vegans take. For me, it is a diet as much as me not eating processed meats and pre-made meals is; some can choose to make it a lifestyle, but I think for many that is out of the question.
That's totally fine, I'm sure you'll get many people happy to discuss nutrition with you on your intro post, I'm not big into counting calories and all that diet planning so I wouldn't be much help apart from to say sweet potatoes are a great source of a bunch of vitimans and minerals where potatoes are lacking. It might be interesting to hear what your philosophical ethical framework is at some point just out of curiosity, but yeah I agree it's best not to overwhelm yourself when you're first sticking your toe in as to what's useful on getting to that better quality of life health wise. Hope you like it here and feel free to tell any of the holier than thou people in your life to shove off, I approve aha.
Unofficial librarian of vegan and socialist movements, video and writing culture.

PhiloVegan Wiki: https://tinyurl.com/y7jc6kh6
Vegan Video Library: https://tinyurl.com/yb3udm8x
Activist Journeys YouTube: https://tinyurl.com/y9vwdcj3

jessdanir
Newbie
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2017 2:25 am
Religion: None (Atheist)
Diet: Meat-Eater

Post by jessdanir » Tue Jun 06, 2017 6:23 am

NonZeroSum wrote:
Tue Jun 06, 2017 4:57 am

That's totally fine, I'm sure you'll get many people happy to discuss nutrition with you on your intro post, I'm not big into counting calories and all that diet planning so I wouldn't be much help apart from to say sweet potatoes are a great source of a bunch of vitimans and minerals where potatoes are lacking. It might be interesting to hear what your philosophical ethical framework is at some point just out of curiosity, but yeah I agree it's best not to overwhelm yourself when you're first sticking your toe in as to what's useful on getting to that better quality of life health wise. Hope you like it here and feel free to tell any of the holier than thou people in your life to shove off, I approve aha.
I try to plan my diet most of the time, more strict with the foods I prepare for lunch (try to make them as balanced and high enough in calories) than I am with dinner. If I don't plan, I end up eating horribly! The worst junk :) Currently my goal is to have vegan lunches, since that is the meal that almost always has meat, where my other meals are mostly vegetarian.

I wouldn't even know where to begin in discussing my philosophical ethical framework, I'm an environmental and energy engineer and tend to look at things based on their overall impact. I am mostly interested in seeing how others think, this site was promoted for being a "rational vegan community" and I hope to find perspectives outside of the "popular" youtube vegans who, in my opinion, try to bully people into veganism.

User avatar
DarlBundren
Senior Member
Posts: 354
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 4:59 pm
Religion: None (Atheist)
Diet: Vegetarian
Location: Southern Europe

Post by DarlBundren » Tue Jun 06, 2017 6:30 am

jessdanir wrote:I'm an environmental and energy engineer and tend to look at things based on their overall impact.
The user miniboes started a thread on clean sources of energy. It'd be nice to hear your opinion.http://philosophicalvegan.com/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=3153

Lambert34
Newbie
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Nov 18, 2017 12:36 am
Religion: Christian
Diet: Meat-Eater

Post by Lambert34 » Sat Nov 18, 2017 1:31 am

Hi! I am new here ! Thank you for the post ! I am currently a non-vegetarian.My parents are non-vegetarians and I eat home-cooked meals.But I wish to become a vegan.So,I should take my first step to become a vegetarian.Then to a vegan.Becoming a vegetarian is not at all hard for me.I want to lose my extra weight.If we can have a better health and delicious food without killing other creatures,then why don't become a vegan?I want to get that joy by being able to benefit the environment and animals without causing any harm to them.So it is high time for me to take this step.
Hopefully,
Lambert

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests