I'm Gonna Miss High School (For the most part)

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I'm Gonna Miss High School (For the most part)

Post by Red » Sun Jan 27, 2019 9:29 pm

So now that I'm about halfway through Senior Year, I want to share with you guys (who are interested) my high school experience, and see if you're willing to offer any commentary on it since you're the only people I feel comfortable discussing this with. This is probably going to include a lot of boring, time-wasting bullshit, but whatever. I'll try to keep it short.

Anyway, this probably gets said by everyone, but the past four years has brought some of the happiest/most miserable times of my life (and this is just school; I wonder what it'll be like 10 years down the road). I guess I'll go through my four years and bring up the bigger parts of the experience.

Freshmen year of high school was, I'd say, the best year of my life up to that point. My grades were pretty good (low to mid 90s), I got back into the Forum (best decision I've ever made 8-)), made some new friends, and overall the year was pretty fun. There were a few slip ups here and there, such as Earth Science being a nightmare (since my teacher fucking sucked (he also denies climate change (and he's the environmental science teacher))), but overall I was pretty happy with everything. Oh yeah, and I was pretty good at video games I guess.

Sophomore year of high school was, I'd say, the worst year of my life up to that point. I may spend a little more time on this, so bear with me.
So starting off the year I took a joke much too far which was already a serious blunder. It was funny at first though, though I still don't understand why I did that (Just to clarify, that entire story is not real. Well, most of it. The part about my cousin dealing drugs is possibly true, which gave me inspiration for it).

Anyway, aside from that, the first marking period was usual same old-same old. My GPA went down a few points from last year, but the first semester was fine for me.

A few months went by, until November, when something... snapped in me. I was sitting at the breakfast table, eating my muffin, drinking my coffee, when I had what alcoholics refer to as a moment of clarity. Well, it was more of a gradual process that led up to that point.

I was basically fed up with school, since I was convinced the education system was completely ineffective at educationing, and was not important to me, or what I wanted to do with my life. At the time, I was convinced I wanted to be a Comedian, so, accordingly, I became apathetic to school and let my grades drop to an 83 (my History and English grades kept it going below that, since those classes are just naturally easy). Yeah, I was a pretty fucking stupid kid. I think I was suffering from burnout or something.

Not to mention my horrendous outlook on life; I was also apathetic to the affairs of the world, and if you remember, I made a pretty big point on how I didn't care about the state of the world since I thought we were all fucked or something. Oh yeah, and I was also a pretty self-centered bastard. I mean it more in the "I only care about what'll happen in my future" type, since I was going through an existential crisis. Not in the 'No one will remember me' way (though that did play a part), it was more in the 'I want everyone hundreds of years from now to know who I am!' Yes, every last person. How I would go about solving this crisis by being a comedian would solve it (I kept around a book that I wrote all my thoughts in with the intent of publishing it and becoming very super famous. I was worried about getting a job that I hated and working for 50 years then dying. Man, I was also pretty fucked up, wasn't I?

I did the bare minimum for most of my classes so I wouldn't have to go to Summer School, and it worked, and I was so relieved when I finally finished the year. But at what cost? I still look back and regret my terribly low GPA and how it hurts my overall grade. I know it isn't a super big deal, but it still bites at me.

There are also a few other things that happened during Sophomore year that are a bit too personal to share here, but these are the biggest points.

Anyway, Junior year was a big pick up for me. It was basically the antithesis to Sophomore year and yadda yadda yadda I'll finish this later.
Learning never exhausts the mind.
-Leonardo da Vinci

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Post by Jamie in Chile » Mon Jan 28, 2019 9:27 pm

Thanks for your thoughts.

I think:

Try and open up to teachers, parents etc and be open minded to what they have to say.

Where you strongly disagree with parents and teachers, keep open minded to both view points and don't be dismissive and decisive.

You may be smarter than people much older than you, but you are not wiser. Your IQ intelligence may be better than adults twice your age, but your emotional intelligence and maturity is below theirs.

When I was 17, I thought I knew about 90% of what mattered in terms of philosophy, politics and other issues etc. I thought I had my ideology mapped out. The reality is I was nowhere close to 90%, maybe 50% or less.

There is a tendency in humans to laugh at our past mistakes but be unable to believe we are making mistakes now; to think of all our previous opinions as wrong but still be convinced that right now we have learned everything. Try to avoid this mindset.

Well there's 5 thoughts. If one of them is useful and the other 4 are total crap that might be an OK result if you can figure out which one is useful.

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Post by Jebus » Mon Jan 28, 2019 11:38 pm

@Jamie in Chile

Great post.
How to become vegan in 4.5 hours:
1.Watch Forks over Knives (Health)
2.Watch Cowspiracy (Environment)
3. Watch Earthlings (Ethics)
Congratulations, unless you are a complete idiot you are now a vegan.

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Post by Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz » Tue Jan 29, 2019 2:57 am

@Jamie in Chile Some very good advice. As a matter of fact, I think it's relevant to anybody regardless of age.
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Post by Red » Sat Feb 02, 2019 9:22 am

Thanks for the post @Jamie in Chile, really great advice for anyone, as Agent Blue said. I already try to apply what you're saying in my life, but I won't deny that sometimes, I'm in over my head.

And you make a good point about not thinking you're making any mistakes now; Of course, I am a better person than I was 2 years ago, but I wouldn't be surprised if in 2 years I look back and say "WTF was I thinking?!" I'm not sure what it can be now, but time'll tell.

In regards to disagreeing with my parents and teachers, I agree we should be open-minded; but when you get to high school, you realize that your parents aren't always right, and even teachers make mistakes. Question everything of course (within reason), especially those who have raised you.

My father, for example, is one of the most intelligent and hard working people I know, but he's super conservative, and a big fan of Trump. I don't really talk politics with him given how much politics gets people going, but let's say he really wants that wall. I've listened to his arguments for them, and I don't find them really compelling.

As for teachers, I haven't spotted many errors other than a few peripheral ones, but a lot of the humanities teachers at my school love to talk politics, which is probably not a very good thing but whatever.

Anyway, I guess I'll make the rest quick since others have already posted.

Juinor year was much better than Sophomore year; my grades were back to where they were, I gained an appreciation for science and politics, I realized that I want to study the sciences when I got to Uni.

And Senior year is currently amazing, lotsa interesting classes (I already took all the classes I needed to graduate last year). I also realized that the hot girl in my class believes the Earth is flat, which is a major boner killer. Whatever.
Learning never exhausts the mind.
-Leonardo da Vinci

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Post by Jamie in Chile » Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:32 pm

Thanks for the update. I hope you are doing well.

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Post by Lay Vegan » Sun Feb 03, 2019 8:13 pm

It’s great to hear that your experience has improved since your sophomore year. If you’re currently a senior, I assume you’ve already applied and been accepted to a university? If so, did you get into a university/program of your top choice?

My high school years are a blur. I was quite timid and rarely participated in class, so I didn’t get a chance to develop meaningful relationships with teachers. I did OK academically, but not well enough to stand out among my peers. Some of my biggest regrets :(

Fortunately, college demands much greater autonomy and independence of students, so it may be your opportunity to really find yourself.

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Post by Red » Sun Feb 03, 2019 8:32 pm

Lay Vegan wrote:
Sun Feb 03, 2019 8:13 pm
It’s great to hear that your experience has improved since your sophomore year. If you’re currently a senior, I assume you’ve already applied and been accepted to a university? If so, did you get into a university/program of your top choice?
Yep, I've been accepted and have received some pretty good scholarships. I'm planning on transferring to another school after I get my Bachelor's, since, although the school of my choice has all the programs I want, it doesn't have a PhD program for what I'm planning on majoring in. We'll see what happens.
Lay Vegan wrote:
Sun Feb 03, 2019 8:13 pm
My high school years are a blur. I was quite timid and rarely participated in class, so I didn’t get a chance to develop meaningful relationships with teachers.
My teachers often tell me to talk less during class if you catch my drift. Sometimes I've annoyed them to high degrees I almost get kicked out. Yeah, I was that kid.
Lay Vegan wrote:
Sun Feb 03, 2019 8:13 pm
I did OK academically, but not well enough to stand out among my peers. Some of my biggest regrets :(
iknowthatfeel.png
iknowthatfeel.png (31.35 KiB) Viewed 641 times
I get told by a lot of friends and teachers that I'm very intelligent and knowledgable, but I personally don't see it in my grades. I've always been an above average student, sure, but I always feel as though I could've done much better.

But the past is the past, no point in bearing on it now.
Lay Vegan wrote:
Sun Feb 03, 2019 8:13 pm
Fortunately, college demands much greater autonomy and independence of students, so it may be your opportunity to really find yourself.
That's what I'm striving for. I've been taking academics MUCH more seriously in the past year, and have been studying various sciences and maths, and have been reading literature on how to improve learning ability.

When put into perspective, High School isn't very difficult. I like to think about it like this; Imagine you're learning the ins and outs of a car. When you're in high school, you learn what each utility does, how to work the car, and the anatomy of the vehicle. In college, you learn how each thing in the car works, why the car works the way it does, and why it is built in such a fashion.

And I'm not planning on going to parties or anything since I'll probably end up with an itchy infection on the head of my cock.
Learning never exhausts the mind.
-Leonardo da Vinci

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Post by Lay Vegan » Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:58 pm

Red wrote:
Sun Feb 03, 2019 8:32 pm
Yep, I've been accepted and have received some pretty good scholarships. I'm planning on transferring to another school after I get my Bachelor's, since, although the school of my choice has all the programs I want, it doesn't have a PhD program for what I'm planning on majoring in. We'll see what happens.
Smart.

After completing your undergrad degree, you may not even want to pursue a PhD. Unfortunately, PhD programs have little return on investment (if we’re talking pure material benefit), but it might still be useful if you’re pursuing a career in research.

I suspect brimstoneSalad may know more about that.
Red wrote:
Sun Feb 03, 2019 8:32 pm
My teachers often tell me to talk less during class if you catch my drift. Sometimes I've annoyed them to high degrees I almost get kicked out. Yeah, I was that kid.
At least in my experience, teachers are typically delighted when students are openly engaged in the lesson — asking questions and countering their arguments. Avoid doing it in a way that makes it come across as defiance or close-minded arrogance. It’s very unlikely that you know more than your teacher (in her respective field) and you want to be cognizant enough to recognize your own limitations. Otherwise you’ll just end up wasting everyone’s time.
Red wrote:
Sun Feb 03, 2019 8:32 pm
Imagine you're learning the ins and outs of a car. When you're in high school, you learn what each utility does, how to work the car, and the anatomy of the vehicle. In college, you learn how each thing in the car works, why the car works the way it does, and why it is built in such a fashion.
Good analogy.
Red wrote:
Sun Feb 03, 2019 8:32 pm
And I'm not planning on going to parties or anything since I'll probably end up with an itchy infection on the head of my cock.
Also smart

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Post by Red » Wed Feb 06, 2019 7:16 pm

Lay Vegan wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:58 pm
After completing your undergrad degree, you may not even want to pursue a PhD. Unfortunately, PhD programs have little return on investment (if we’re talking pure material benefit), but it might still be useful if you’re pursuing a career in research.
Well, it's not just for any material benefit, it's just to push the boundry of human knowledge a tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny, TINY bit.

It's also on my bucket list.
Lay Vegan wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:58 pm
I suspect brimstoneSalad may know more about that.
@brimstoneSalad talked with Teo about it a few months back, so I would say yes.
Lay Vegan wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:58 pm
At least in my experience, teachers are typically delighted when students are openly engaged in the lesson — asking questions and countering their arguments. Avoid doing it in a way that makes it come across as defiance or close-minded arrogance. It’s very unlikely that you know more than your teacher (in her respective field) and you want to be cognizant enough to recognize your own limitations. Otherwise you’ll just end up wasting everyone’s time.
Well, it was more of like me just talking too much. I almost never correct a teacher in front of the whole class, unless it's something incredibly minor, like a computational error. But yeah overall just me running at the lip you know what I'm saying.
Learning never exhausts the mind.
-Leonardo da Vinci

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